Course Outline: OK, Southern Nazarene University

By: Higher Education

Abstract: CS 3123: C++ Programming

Lecture 9:00 - 9:50 M W F           Science 10




Instructor:

Dr. John Goulden
Office Science 25
Office Hours 11:00 - 12:15 M W F or by appointment
Voice / Voice Mail 491-6607
e-mail jgoulden@snu.edu




Position in Curriculum:

This is a junior-level course required of all students who desire the Bachelor's Degree or the minor from the Department of Computing and Information Systems.



Required Text and Materials:

A suitable book on the C++ programming language; books will be discussed on first day of class
Access to a personal computer with the C++ programming language. The university computer labs in the Royce Brown and Science buildings are equipped with IBM-PC compatibles. Turbo C++, Borland C++ and Microsoft Visual C++ are (or will be) available on the network.



Abstract:

The goals of this class are (1) enable the student to master the C++ programming language; (2) examine the essential architecture of the IBM-PC computer system, (3) introduce the concepts of 'real-world' programming in C++, and (4) introduce the essentials of GUI programming in C++. The course is presented in three segments: first, a fairly rapid tour of the essential grammar, syntax, and style of C++ as a second language (it is assumed that all students in this course have completed the two-semester Introduction to Computer Science sequence in which Pascal was the language used); second, focus on those aspects of C++ that are unique, such as objects, inheritance, and polymorphism; and third, real-world issues such as memory management, GUI programming, writing for different operating systems such as UNIX, object-oriented programming, use of prewritten classes such as OWL and MFC, and what 'real' computer-science professionals do for a living.



Prerequisites:

CS 2443 - Introduction to Computer Science

CS 2543 - Algorithmic Processes




Grading Scale:

90-100% A Homework and Programs -- 40%
80-89% B Essays -- 15%
65-79% C Three in-class exams -- 30%
55-64% D Comprehensive final exam -- 10%
0-54% F

Grades will be posted periodically on the bulletin board outside the instructor's office. To protect the privacy of the students, grades will be identified by the last four digits of the student ID number (or any four-digit number requested by the student) in numerical order. Information posted will include averages in each of the above categories, composite average, accumulated absences and tardies, and a letter grade.



Incompletes:

Incompletes will be granted only in cases of unusual and unforeseeable hardship. Simply falling behind in the course will not be considered a sufficient reason for granting an incomplete. If granted, an incomplete must be made up the following semester; the University will not carry an incomplete for more than one semester unless special arrangements are made through the Office of the Registrar.



Quizzes:

Quizzes, both announced and unannounced, will be administered throughout the semester. The instructor will often use the first five or six minutes of class time for quizzes. Material is taken from the current lecture material, homework, and reading assignments. Quiz scores are incorporated into your homework grade.



Attendance Policies:

Attendance will be taken at the beginning of lecture. Each absence in excess of three will result in a three-point deduction from your composite average. Excessive absences will have a dramatic effect on your grade in addition to points lost due to any work missed. Excessive tardies will also be penalized; one point is deducted from your composite average for each tardy in excess of three. 'Tardy' is defined as entering the classroom after the time of 9:00 AM for lecture; 'time' is defined as the value currently displayed on the instructor's watch.

If you will be absent due to participation in some officially-sanctioned University function, you should notify the instructor before that time and arrange to make up any work that will be missed. Such 'excused' absences are not penalized in any way providing you make such arrangements. The Academic Dean circulates lists naming those students that will miss class on these occasions; please be sure that your name is on the appropriate list so that your absence can be considered 'excused.'



Late or Missed Work Policies:

Late homework will be accepted, but the value of late homework will be reduced by 20% per calendar day late. Homework is considered late if it is not turned in at the beginning of the class period on the due date. If by illness or other misfortune you must miss class, it is your responsibility to obtain lecture notes and assignments for the missed day, and to ensure that any work due that day is turned in on time. If you find that you must miss an exam, you must call the instructor before that time to arrange a makeup. Failure to do so will result in a zero for that exam! Quizzes missed for any reason other than an 'excused' absence cannot be made up.



Students with Disabilities

If you need assistance with a disability that may affect your academic progress in this or any course at SNU, you are encouraged to contact the Academic Services Center (491-6694).



Essay Assignments:

Each week (well, almost each week) you will write a brief review and essay on some aspect of the computer profession that is related at least loosely to the C family of programming languages. This essay should be no less than one but no more than two machine-printed double-spaced pages. The bulk of the essay will be a review of one or more related articles from a current computer-related book, journal, or magazine in which you simply report the facts or opinions as stated by your sources. This 'review' will be followed by your own comments or speculation on the subject reviewed. Finally, provide complete citations for the works used.

The maximum value of an essay is related to the number of relevant sources used:

number of sources maximum grade
1 8
2 10
3 12

A significant penalty will be imposed if the sources are unrelated. This will be determined by your ability to tie the content of two or more articles together in a cohesive manner in your essay. You must use at least one print-media document in each essay.



Homework and Programming Assignments:

Numerous homework problems will be assigned during the semester. Some (especially during the first part of the semester) are pencil-and-paper problems; from the middle of the semester on most homework will include a significant programming element. Since the principal focus of this course is to learn a particular computer language, you will write several programs of increasing length and complexity during the semester and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your mastery of the C++ language. Since the grading criteria will change with almost every assignment, the appropriate details will be provided with each.



Pop Quizzes:

Quizzes of every variety - announced and unannounced, closed-book and open-book, graded 'for real' or free points for everyone present -- will be administered throughout the semester. Quiz scores will count as a portion of your homework grade. Missed quizzes cannot be made up.



Exams:

Exam questions can be of any type: definitions, fill in the blank, multiple guess, short answer, and so on. All exams are closed book and closed note. The final exam will be comprehensive in nature.



Academic Integrity:

It is expected that all students are familiar with and will adhere to all University and Departmental policies related to academic integrity.



Schedule of Exam and Essay-Due Dates:

Fri, Aug 29 First day of class
Mon, Sept 1
Wed, Sept 3
Fri, Sept 5
Mon, Sept 8 ESSAY ONE DUE TODAY
Wed, Sept 10
Fri, Sept 12
Mon, Sept 15 ESSAY TWO DUE TODAY
Wed, Sept 17
Fri, Sept 19 EXAM I
Mon, Sept 22 ESSAY THREE DUE TODAY
Wed, Sept 24
Fri, Sept 26
Mon, Sept 29 ESSAY FOUR DUE TODAY
Wed, Oct 1
Fri, Oct 3
Mon, Oct 6 ESSAY FIVE DUE TODAY
Wed, Oct 8
Fri, Oct 10 EXAM II
Mon, Oct 13 ESSAY SIX DUE TODAY
Wed, Oct 15
Fri, Oct 17 NO CLASS, FALL BREAK
Mon, Oct 20 NO CLASS, FALL BREAK
Wed, Oct 22
Fri, Oct 24
Mon, Oct 27 ESSAY SEVEN DUE TODAY
Wed, Oct 29
Fri, Oct 31
Mon, Nov 3 ESSAY EIGHT DUE TODAY
Wed, Nov 5
Fri, Nov 7 EXAM III
Mon, Nov 10 ESSAY NINE DUE TODAY
Wed, Nov 12
Fri, Nov 14
Mon, Nov 17 ESSAY TEN DUE TODAY
Wed, Nov 19
Fri, Nov 21
Mon, Nov 24 ESSAY ELEVEN DUE TODAY
Wed, Nov 26 EXAM IV
Fri, Nov 28 NO CLASS, THANKSGIVING BREAK!
Mon, Dec 1 ESSAY TWELVE DUE TODAY
Wed, Dec 3
Fri, Dec 5
Mon, Dec 8
Wed, Dec 10
Fri, Dec 12 Last Day of Class


FINAL EXAM


Author: Webmaster (Joe Gschwandtner)

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