Course Outline: IN, Purdue University

By: Higher Education

Abstract: CPT 155D: File Organizationand Processing

Purdue University
155D File Organization and Processing

For the most recent updates to this syllabus see Purdue University

Catalog Description

Continued study of the software development life cycle with emphasis on fundamental file organizations and processing techniques. Study of file processing algorithms for sequential, relative and indexed files. Comparison of storage space and access times. Continued applications of structured design and programming in projects using these file structures. Introduction to data structures.

Organization and Schedule             Lecture 2, Lab 2, Credit 3

Semester Meeting Type Days Time Location
Fall '96 lecture 01 T,Th 1:30-2:20 KNOY B035
lecture 02 T,Th 2:30-3:20 KNOY B035
lab 01 Monday 7:30-9:20 KNOY 228
lab 02 Monday 9:30-11:20 KNOY 228
lab 03 Monday 11:30-1:20 KNOY 228
lab 04 Monday 1:30-3:20pm KNOY 228
testout None
help sessions evenings TBA TBA
last day to add 9/6/96 CPT Policy
last day to drop 8/30/96 with no transcript record
last day to drop 9/16/96 without a grade
last day to drop 10/23/96 with a grade (freshmen and University division)
last day to drop 10/23/96 with a grade (all other students)

Prerequisites        required          CPT 150 Introduction to Visual Programming

Course Description and/or Theme

This course teaches you (1) how to utilize files, data structures and simple databases in the event-driven, visual programming environment, (2) how to utilize additional visual components, and (3) how to design programs to utilize both (1) and (2). The course goal is to enable students to design visual programs that will use these new visual components, files and simple databases. Students will learn to construct logical design models that represent business requirements of the programs.

CPT 155D is the second course in the programming sequence. CPT 150 Structured Programming is a required prerequisite course for CPT 155D, and addresses database concepts with emphasis on event-driven, visual and structured programming concepts along with the complete program development process. CPT450A is an elective visual programming course that expands programming to the client/server environment with databases.

Keywords Applicable to Career Development and Job Hunting

  • GUI, Windows or Visual Programming
  • Event-driven Programming
  • Business Requirements
  • Program Development Life Cycle
  • Program Testing
  • Program Maintenance
  • Program Documentation
  • Sequential Files
  • Random Files
  • Databases

Information Technology Used In This Course

  1. Microsoft Windows NT (your network operating system)
  2. Microsoft Windows for Workgroups (your desktop operating system)
  3. Microsoft Word for Windows (for word processing, design and documentation)
  4. Borland Delphi 2- Client/Server Version (for program development)

Course Audience

This is a core course for CPT associate/baccalaureate majors. Non-majors must demonstrate prerequisite knowledge to enroll in this course. The instructor permits course audits, but only if the auditor is not taking a seat away from a paying student.

Course Manager

Name Office Phone Email Address Office Hours
Susan Lisack KNOY 217 49-42568 sklisack@tech.purdue.edu M, F 8:30-9:20am

Other Course Instructors
Name Office Phone Email Address Office Hours
Susan Lisack KNOY 217 494-2568 sklisack@tech.purdue.edu M, F 8:30-9:20am
Michael Payne KNOY 219 494-2566 mjpayne@tech.purdue.edu (as posted)

Required Textbooks, Lab Manuals, and Supplies

Pacheco, Xavier and Teixeria, Steve, Delphi 2 Developer's Guide (1996), Indianapolis, IN: Sams. (1322 pages)

This textbook is an industry standard reference for DELPHI development. We will cover Chapters 1, 2, 4, 6,-8, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24.

The instructor plans to utilize the textbook materials in class lectures, labs and projects. It is essential that you complete your reading assignments prior to class. You should expect a reading-level quiz on every assigned chapter or appendix of this book.

5 Blank, Formatted Diskettes (3.5", DSHD, 1.44MB)

5 Pocket/Prong folders

Dividers with tabs

20 Address labels

Student Objectives

After successfully completing this course, you should be able to:

  1. Discuss, in intelligent conversation, visual components, data structures, files, and simple databases and their implementation in programs.
  2. Apply the program development life cycle to business problem domains.
  3. Draw program models for a business problem domain. These information models should meet best practice standards with respect to program structure, stability, reusability, and enhancement.
  4. Translate logical program models into working visual programs. Delphi will be targeted as that program development environment.

Instructor Objectives

    Your instructor's goal is to maximize the educational experience of those students who bring an appropriate and sincere effort and serious interest in the subject matter to the classroom. The instructor will not waste their time or his on those students less prepared or committed.
    In the spirit of continuous curriculum improvement, the instructor's objectives are:
    1. To improve the integration logical program model development approach into the program development life cycle.
    2. To better reinforce logical program modeling concepts through the use and application of sample program models.
    3. To introduce logical program model "views" to the course.
    4. To expand the coverage of programming to include more visual components, data structures, files and simple databases.
    5. To assign labs and projects to better prepare students for the visual programming environment and the individual projects.

    Course Requirements and Learning Assessment

    Knowledge Students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of program design and development using additional visual components, data structures , files and simple databases concepts that exceeds rote memorization and mechanical application. Examinations will be used to assess this level of learning.
    Techniques Students are expected to demonstrate the application of program modeling tools, techniques, and technology. Lab problems will be used to assess this level of learning.
    Application Students are expected to be able to apply concepts and techniques to the solution of a highly unstructured business problem. Three individual projects will be used to assess this level of learning.
    Other Students are expected to contribute to their own learning experience through regular class attendance and a disciplined completion of reading assignments.

    How Final Grades will be Determined (subject to change with notice)

    Points and/or Weights
    Assessment Mechanism Total Points Weighting
    Attendance 100 points 10 %
    Reading Quizzes 100 points 10 %
    Examinations 300 points 30 %
    Midterm - In Class/Take Home
    Final - In Class/Take
    Labs 150 points 15%
    Projects 350 points 35 %
    Project #1 Design/Code
    Project #2 Design/Code
    Project #3 Design/Code
    TOTAL 1000 points 100%

    Grading Scale

    Grade            Scale                Notes or Prior Term's Distribution

    A                90 - 100 %

    B                80 - 89+ %

    C                 70 - 79+ %

    D                60 - 69+ %

    E                not applicable given only under very extenuating circumstances

    F                0 - 59+ %

    I                 See policy.

    W/WF                See policy.

    NOTE: A student must pass both the Coding (Projects/Labs) with an average of at least 60% and the Exams/Quizzes with an average of at least 60% to pass the entire course.

    Miscellaneous Notes and Comments

    1. Scores and grades will be posted outside of Knoy 219,on the CPTnet as G:CPT155GRADES.XLS and on the World Wide Web at http:tech.purdue.educpt155grades.html. Historically, the network version and the WWW are usually the most up-to-date. Student records will be sorted either by the last 6 digits of the student-id-number, or by the percentage of highest total score received so far. Postings will be updated on a bimonthly basis, or as time permits.
    2. Final grades will NOT be curved. NOTE: A 79.9% is a "C", NOT a "B"!
    3. PROJECT MASTERY: Scores for completed projects will not be recorded if the program produces incorrect output, severely violates structured programming principles, has more than 5 style violations, or does not contain the student's name in the program's header block. The project will need to be resubmitted in order to receive a score for that project. Projects can only be resubmitted ONCE! If all corrections are not made, the project grade will drop one additional letter grade.
    4. EXTRA CREDIT (Bonus points): Extra credit points will be offered for turning completed labs or projects in early. Extra credit will be awarded as follows: 5% will be added to the grade for each day the assignment is turned in early up to 10%. I do not count weekends or university holidays.
    5. Incompletes will only be given under (1) extenuating circumstances that caused the student to be absent for an extended period of time, or (2) failure to complete the semester project. Extended absences must be documented through the Dean of Students Office and will be validated by the instructor. Project-based incompletes will be penalized a minimum of one letter grade for the course.

    Course Policies

    Attendance, Preparation, and Courtesy Expectations and Policies

    1. Attendance is mandatory. You are expected to be present, be prepared, and behave professionally for every meeting of the course. You must remember to sign in each day to get attendance credit for that day/ Students leaving early, sleeping in class, disrupting class or arriving late may not receive attendance credit for that day.
    2. Your percentage of attendance will be counted as 100 points or 10% toward your final grade. Excused absences include, but are not limited to, death in the immediate family, serious personal or immediate family illness resulting in hospitalization, jury duty, military service, employment interviews, and employment plant trips. Advance notice to the instructor is required, when possible. Documented proof substantiating the reason for absence is required. The student is required to submit a copy of this documentation to the instructor within 1 week of returning to class. Failure to do so will result in an unexcused absence. This documentation may be in the form of a doctors note, pharmacy or hospital receipt, death notice, etc. The instructor reserves the right to determine excused absences.
    3. In the event of an extended absence (usually five days or longer), you should contact the Dean of Students Office to report the absence and receive advice on how to proceed. Upon your return to campus, you must promptly contact your instructor to determine if and how missed work will be made up.
    4. In the event of an excused or unexcused absence, you alone are responsible for promptly discovering what you missed.
    5. Unexcused absences include, but are not limited to, oversleeping and just skipping class. The instructor reserves the right to determine unexcused absences.
    6. Handouts will be distributed in class or via the network. Students who notify the instructor of an absence prior to class will receive handouts via their pick-up file in Knoy 242 or via the network.
    7. In the event that your instructor is not present when class is scheduled to begin, you are required to wait 15 minutes as a professional courtesy. After that time, you may leave without any penalty.
    8. All students are expected to display a positive, professional attitude throughout the semester in every class meeting. Disruptive, argumentative, and other unprofessional behavior will result in the student being dismissed from the class and earning an unexcused absence.
    9. If during this course, you experience a managerial problem with the conduct of the course (i.e. instructor not available during office hours, inappropriate teaching behavior, discrimination, etc.), you should follow the guidelines in the Student Handbook. In general, first, you must go to the instructor with whom you are experiencing the problem. Next, go to the assistant department head.

    Add/Drop Expectations and Policies

    1. According to CPT educational policy, this course may not be added to any student's academic schedule after the third week of a Fall or Spring semester (or equivalent for a Summer semester) except under very extenuating circumstances to be approved by the Assistant Department Head of Computer Technology.
    2. According to CPT educational policy, no independent study course can be substituted for this course.
    3. Withdrawals from this course are possible at any time; however, refer to the mortar board for published university withdrawal dates. For students withdrawing after the deadline for withdrawing without a grade, grades will be based on overall course performance. It is the students responsibility to withdraw from this course. Students who do not officially withdraw will be given an "F". Refer to the University Regulations handbook.

    Quiz and Exam Policies

    1. Quizzes will be either announced or unannounced; however, the instructor usually gives a reading quiz over every reading assignment.
    2. There are makeups for quizzes. If an absence is excused, the quiz must be taken prior to absence unless under extenuating circumstances. If absence under extenuating circumstances, the quiz must be made up within one week after the student returns to the university. Documentation proving the excused absence may be required at the time the quiz is made up.
    3. Students who miss the mid-term examination (for a valid reason) must make arrangements with the instructor to complete that work within one (1) week of returning to class. Failure to do so will result in a score of zero. The mid-term exam is usually given at night at a common time for all lecture sections with a lecture class day canceled in return (see schedule). If you are unable to attend the scheduled mid-term exam, prior, written notice must be provided to the lecture instructor and the course manager.

    Students who miss the final examination (for a valid reason) will generally receive an incomplete ("I") course grade. It is the student's responsibility to promptly notify the instructor and provide documentation proving the reason for missing the exam. Students missing the final exam (for an unexcused reason) will receive a zero.

    1. The graded final examination will not be returned. It is being retained by the department for possible future use in testouts. However, you may review your final examination results by making an appointment with your instructor.

    Homework Policies and Quality Expectations

    1. Unless otherwise stated, labs, assignments, and projects are due by 4:00 PM on the assigned due date as documented on the class schedule page.
    2. All submissions must include the completed, computerized version of the CPT Office Submission Form template.
    3. Assignments must be submitted for grading to the CPT Main Office in Knoy 242. All submissions will be dated and time-stamped unless stated otherwise. The office closes promptly at 5:00 PM; therefore all materials must be submitted by 4:00 PM to be considered "on time." The instructor will not accept homework in class or in his office.
    4. Multiple page assignments must be stapled or be placed in a pocket or pronged folder.
    5. Any Labs submitted to the CPT Main Office, must include the following: .DPR and .PAS files with a comment block in each file containing the student name along with lab number and information, a copy of form at design time and a screen capture of the form at run time showing the results, and a diskette with an executable of the lab on it. All this must be submitted as stated in 3 and 4 above.
    6. LATE WORK: Late labs assignments will be penalized 10% for the first day and 5% for each day after that, excluding weekends, University holidays, and University vacation periods. All late labs must be turned in within one week of when the it was due.
    7. LATE WORK DUE TO EXTENTUATING CIRCUMSTANCES: Excused late lab assignments must be turned in within one week of returning to class to receive full credit. Documentation proving the excused absence may be required at the time the lab assignment is made up. Unexcused late lab will be penalized as stated in item 6 above.
    8. All assignments are expected to be prepared in a professional manner. Always check your assignments for correct spelling and grammar. Points will be subtracted for mistakes. Points will be subtracted for submitting poorly or improperly organized work, or for not following instructions. Unprofessional work will not be graded and additional late penalties will accumulate until the work is submitted in a professional manner.
    9. To protect your privacy, graded materials will never be passed around the classroom or placed outside of an instructor's office door. Every student in this course has a "pickup file" in Knoy 242. You can pick up graded materials (and announcements) in Knoy 242 during normal business operating hours).
    10. Excused late lab assignments must be turned in within one week of returning to class to receive full credit. Documentation proving the excused absence may be required at the time the lab assignment is made up. Unexcused late lab assignments may be turned in within one week of the original due date for half (1/2 ) credit.

    Project Policies and Quality Expectations

    1. All project submissions must include the completed, computerized version of the CPT Office Submission Form template.
    2. Projects must be submitted for grading to the CPT Main Office in Knoy 242. All submissions will be date and time-stamped. The office closes promptly at 5:00 PM; therefore all materials must be submitted by 4:00 PM to be considered "on time." The instructor will not accept homework in class or in his office.
    3. Projects will be completed in 2 phases - written design, then the completed code. Each part is to be submitted in a pronged folder according the project submission standards handout.
    4. Projects that do not produce correct output will not be accepted! If your project output does not meet the requirements of the program specifications, it is incorrect and you will be required to resubmit it, incurring any late penalties. Correct output means that screen messages and answers, reports and files are accurate, and the user can perform all the actions as stated in the project specifications.
    5. ANY OF THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS WILL RESULT IN AN AUTOMATIC GRADE REDUCTION OF A LETTER GRADE FOR THE CURRENT PROJECT AND YOU WILL BE REQUIRED TO CORRECT THE ERROR(S) AND RESUBMIT YOUR PROJECT WITHIN 5 DAYS:
      * Failure to submit all your program listings to your instructor by the due date and
      time.
      * On your diskette, submitting a file which is improperly designated or not including
      all files needed.
      * Submitting a program which does not have a header block specifying your name.
      * Submitting a program which does not successfully compile.
      * Submitting a program which does not produce correct output. Note: You will not
      receive any credit for the program until the output is correct.
    6. LATE WORK: Late projects will be penalized 10% per day, excluding weekends, University holidays, and University vacation periods.
    7. Always check your assignments for spelling and grammar. Points will be subtracted for mistakes.
    8. Points will be subtracted for submitting poorly or improperly organized work, or for not following instructions.
    9. To protect your privacy, graded materials will never be passed around the classroom or placed outside of an instructor's office door. Every student in this course has a "pickup file" in Knoy 242. You can pick up graded materials (and announcements) in Knoy 242 during normal business operating hours).

    Re-Grading Policies

    1. It is the students' responsibility to keep all graded materials that have been returned. Graded materials should be picked up on a weekly basis in the CPT Departmental Office (KNOY 242). The instructor's grades will be assumed to be accurate unless you can prove otherwise. Always keep a computer disk copy of ALL work turned in to your instructor. Any student wishing a re-grade must submit a WRITTEN document indicating the specific section the student is requesting a re-grade of and a complete explanation (rationale) of why the student feels that they deserve a different grade. Verbal re-grade requests will not be accepted! Re-grade requests must be made within two weeks of the students receipt of the graded material. The instructor reserves the right to regrade the entire assignment and not just the specific portion in question. Your grade may be raised or lowered by a regrade request.
    2. Use the electronic version of the CPT Office Submission Form for regrades. You may type your explanation in the miscellaneous notes section (or on a separate page).
    3. According to University regulations, only final course grades can be "appealed." There is a formal School of Technology and University timetable and process for grade appeals. It must be followed exactly! Questions about grade appeals should be directed to the Assistant Department Head of Computer Technology or the Chair of the School of Technology Grade Appeals Committee.

    Lab Policies and Expectations

    1. If you use CPT laboratories, you are responsible for any and all laboratory policies - including the security policies that govern your account. Policies do change from time to time; therefore, you should review the CPTnet and Laboratory Policies at the beginning of each semester. Accounts can be temporarily or permanently suspended for policy violations.
    2. In the event that your account is suspended for any laboratory or network policy violation, this course will not extend deadlines or eliminate late penalties for assignments that could not be completed because of the suspension.
    3. You are responsible for maintaining adequate backups of all programs you create ( a three-generation backup is recommended). Furthermore, you are responsible for keeping an exact copy of anything you hand in for a grade. Never use the machine without diskettes to back up your work. Your instructor is not responsible for loss of data or workstation printer failure. Loss of programs due to inadequate backups may result in late penalties for work that cannot be submitted on time. If you don't understand three-generation backup procedures, ask before it's too late!
    4. All students will be expected to abide by ALL laboratory policies. Failure to do so may result in the loss of all laboratory privileges, with no reduction in course requirements. Food, drinks and smoking are not permitted in the laboratory. You are expected to be present during the entire scheduled laboratory period, unless you have completed the entire assignment for the following week and receive your instructor's permission to be excused from the remainder of the lab.
    5. All computer assignments will require some work outside of the scheduled lab meetings. Workstations are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Workstations may not be available when other courses' scheduled laboratories are in session. Be considerate of other students and professors when using these workstations! Also, plan your schedules so that you will have time outside of class to get your assignments done in a timely manner.
    6. Computer viruses pose a danger to any files you create in public labs (or on private systems on which foreign disks have been introduced). Use anti-virus software on a regular basis to protect yourself against virus infection.
    7. Software piracy is a serious matter. Making copies of the software in the lab is considered theft of Purdue University property. Any student stealing software is subject to administrative action and/or disciplinary penalties. The LAN software constantly monitors software copying. Students may NOT install any software on the workstations or the fileservers.

    Academic Dishonesty ("Cheating") Policies

    1. Is it worth the risk to be suspended from school for one or more semesters at this late date in your academic career? Don't Cheat!
    2. You are expected to do your own original work and to acknowledge correctly, the work of others used in your writing. Copies of the original author's work(s) must be submitted with your assignment. One student doing/taking another's work (in whole or part) or collaborating with other(s) and submitting that work (in whole or part) as his/her individual effort (perhaps with cosmetic changes) constitutes cheating. Using unauthorized crib sheets or copying answers from another student/written material/diskette when completing in-class assignments, quizzes, and exams constitutes cheating. Gaining unauthorized access to exams, quizzes, or instructor's keys or any student's answer is cheating.
    3. Your instructor recognizes the learning value in exchanging ideas with others and learning from mistakes and solutions of others; however this type of unauthorized sharing will very likely result in suspiciously similar work that is not and individual effort. ALL work that you submit must truly represent your INDIVIDUAL effort. You should be aware that it is next to impossible to for someone to forget a unique, creative approach once it has been seen/shared/heard. Most work in this class requires multiple levels of creativity, so that it is difficult to detect work submitted under suspicious circumstances. The best way to avoid being caught in the middle of a suspicious situation is to NOT discuss/how/share your work (in whole or in part) with/to others.
    4. Throughout the semester, your instructor will work through related problems and make the solutions available in labs. You are encouraged to use these solutions to improve your understanding of course concepts and to facilitate your completion of course assignments. However, your are not permitted to exchange/give/take/use any other person's work without prior, written permission from your instructor. Failure to abide by this policy is considered cheating. If you experience difficulty in completing course assignments, you are encouraged to seek the assistance of your instructor during scheduled lab meetings and schedule office hours (or to schedule an appointment). Additional assistance will be made available as needed and can be arranged.
    5. Giving another student access to your computer account, or negligently permitting another student to access your computer account constitutes cheating on your part if that student copies any files that become implicated in a cheating case. Protect your account as if your academic career depends on it!
    6. Cheating, or helping another student to cheat, are considered equal cases of academic dishonesty and will be dealt with as noted below.
    7. Any form of cheating on any examination in the course will result in an automatic "F" grade for the course, and the case will be forwarded to the Office of the Dean of Students for appropriate disciplinary action.
    8. Any form of cheating on a homework or lab exercise will result in both a zero score for the assignment, and a one letter grade penalty in the course. Also, the case will be forwarded to the Office of the Dean of Students for appropriate disciplinary action.
    9. Any form of cheating on a quiz will result in a zero score for that quiz, and the case will be forwarded to the Office of the Dean of Students for appropriate disciplinary action.

    Course Outline (subject to change)

    1. Conceptual Topics
      1. Pascal Records and Structures
      2. Typed files and Random Access
      3. Units and Class Libraries
      4. VCL
      5. Typecases and Sets
      6. Arrays and Pointers
      7. Exception Blocks
      8. Data Structures
        1. Linked Lists
        2. Stacks
        3. Queues
      9. Database Fundamentals
        1. Field Manipulation
        2. Adding and Deleting Records
        3. Query Manipulation
        4. Adding and Deleting Records in a multi-table scenario
    2. Visual Components
      1. Menus and Popup Menus
      2. CheckBox, RadioButton, Group Radio Button, and Common Dialogs
      3. Template About Box
      4. Tabset and Notebook Combination
      5. ComboBox and Timer
      6. Tabbed Notebook and MaskedEdit
      7. Header and SpeedButton(Toolbars)
      8. Grids
      9. Panel (StatusBar)
      10. Table and DataSource
      11. DBGrid and DBNavigator
      12. DBText, DBEdit, and DBMemo
      13. Query
      14. DBCheckBox, DBGroupRadioButton
      15. Master Detail with mutiple datasources (MDI)

    Course Calendar of meetings and/or Assignments (subject to change)

    Week or Date
    Monday
    Tuesday
    Thursday
    1 8/19/96
    Lab 1:

    Introduction to Delphi 2

    Porting a Delphi 1 application to Delphi 2
    Course Introduction

    Chpt 8 Delphi 2

    Chpt 19 Working with Files (Text)

    Chpt 10 Working with Menus pages 316-331, 346-355
    Chpt 19 Working with Files (Text)

    Chpt 10 Working with Menus pages 316-331, 346-355
    2 8/26/96
    Lab 2

    Files (Text/Typed)

    Menus and Popup menus

    Common Dialogs

    Handout Project #1
    Chpt 19 Working with Files (Typed)

    Chpt 10 Common Dialogs pages 346-355

    Checkbox, Radio Buttons, Radio Group
    Chpt 19 Working with Files (Typed)

    Chpt 10 Common Dialogs pages 346-355

    Checkbox, Radio Buttons, Radio Group
    3 9/2/96
    LABOR DAY - NO CLASSES
    Chpt 5 Files that Make Up a Delphi Project pages 119-133

    About Box
    Chpt 5 Files that Make Up a Delphi Project pages 119-133

    About Box
    4 9/9/96
    Lab 3

    Check Boxes, Radio Buttons, Group Boxes, and Radio Groups
    Chpt 2 The Object Pascal Language

    Tabset and Notebook Combination
    Chpt 2 The Object Pascal Language

    Tabset and Notebook Combination
    5 9/16/96
    Lab 4

    Typed Conversion

    Project #1 Design Due
    Tabset and Notebook Combination

    Tabbed Notebook

    Timer
    Tabset and Notebook Combination

    Tabbed Notebook

    Timer
    6 9/23/96
    Lab 5

    Tabset and Notebook, Tabbed Notebook, and Timer
    Combo Boxes

    Chpt 2 Structured Exception Handling Pages 68-74
    Combo Boxes

    Chpt 2 Structured Exception Handling Pages 68-74

    Midterm Course Evaluation
    7 9/30/96
    Lab 6

    Combo Box

    Exception Blocks
    Chapter 24 Testing and Debugging
    Midterm Exam

    Handout Take Home Midterm
    8 10/7/96
    OCTOBER BREAK - NO CLASSES
    OCTOBER BREAK - NO CLASSES
    Chapter 24 Testing and Debugging
    9 10/14/96
    Lab 7

    Testing and Debugging

    Project #1 Code Due
    Chpt 2 Arrays and Pointers Pages 40-46

    Data Structures
    Chpt 2 Arrays and Pointers Pages 40-46

    Data Structures
    10 10/21/96
    Lab 8

    Arrays and Pointers

    Data Structures

    Handout Project #2
    Other

    Data Structures
    Other

    Data Structures
    11 10/28/96
    Lab 9

    Data Structures
    Linked Lists

    Data Structures
    Linked Lists

    Data Structures
    12 11/4/96
    Lab 10

    Grids and Panels
    Linked Lists

    Data Structures
    Linked Lists

    Data Structures
    13 11/11/96
    Lab 11

    Tables and DataSource

    Project #2 Design Due
    Chpt 20 Writing Database Applications
    Chpt 20 Writing Database Applications
    14 11/18/96
    Lab 12

    Database

    Field Manipulation,

    Adding, Deleting Records
    Chpt 20 Writing Database Applications
    Chpt 20 Writing Database Applications
    15 11/25/96
    Lab 13

    Database Queries
    Final Course Evaluation

    Chpt 20 Writing Database Applications
    THANKSGIVING BREAK - NO CLASSES
    16 12/2/96
    Demonstrate Project #2

    Project #2

    Code Due
    Course Wrap-up Final Exam Review
    17 12/9/96
    LAST DAY FOR GRADE CORRECTIONS

    OR

    TO TURN IN ASSIGNMENTS

    WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 11, 1996

    BY 4:00PM
    FINAL EXAM
    DATE: TO BE ANNOUNCED TIME: TO BE ANNOUNCED LOCATION: TO BE ANNOUNCED



Server Response from: ETNASC03