Borland C++ 5.5 Free Command-line Tools Supplementary Information

By: Christopher Moeller

Abstract: Provides explicit instructions for setting up and using the free command-line compiler.


Supplementary Information regarding Borland C++ 5.5 Command-line Tools

To install the Borland C++ 5.5 Free Command-line Tools, simply double-click on the downloaded file and choose all of the default options.  After the compiler installs to your hard disk, it must be configured following the directions in the file README.TXT.  Clarification of the instructions found in that file are included below.

Now, the compiler you downloaded is a command-line compiler application, as distinguished from a Windows application.  In Windows, usually double-clicking on an icon or file is all that is necessary to execute an application.  Then, after the program loads, a graphical interface is presented to the user.

Console applications, on the other hand, accept various parameters and switches that are typed in at the command line or from a batch file.  Though not as common under Windows, many operating systems, such as UNIX or Linux use this format.  Use of Borland C++ 5.5 assumes the user is comfortable working within a console interface. Typically, the user will run an application such as edit or Notepad to actually write their program (an editor is not supplied with the compiler).  When the user wishes to compile source code, they save the file out as "filename.cpp" and then use the command-line tools from within DOS to compile and create an executable.  Like so:

bcc32 filename.cpp

The first argument is name of the compiler tool, and the second argument contains the C++ source file.  This application will attempt to compile the source code and will notify the user of any errors in the code.  If no errors are found it will create an executable. To display information regarding the various switches, type "bcc32"


Step-by-step Instructions for Configuring your System for the Command-Line Compiler

______________________________

Configuring the system environment:

Open a console box.
1.  Start | Run...
2.  Type "cmd" into the field [Enter] (or 'command', if 'cmd' is not found)

* If Windows 95/98:
Navigate to the root in order to modify the PATH reference in the autoexec.bat file.
3.  Type "cd" [Enter]
4.  Type "edit autoexec.bat" [Enter]
5.  Insert a line and type "PATH=C:\BORLAND\BCC55\BIN;%PATH%"
6.  Save the changes (Alt-F then hit S).
7.  Exit edit. (Alt+F then press X).

* If Windows NT:
Add a path reference to the Environment variables:
3.  Using the mouse, right-click on the "My Computer" icon (on your desktop) and choose "Properties".
4.  Click on the "Environment" tab.
5.  Click on "Path" in the "System Variables" field.
6.  Highlight the "Path" System variable (bottom).
7.  Click in the "Value" field.
8.  Append the line with ";C:\BORLAND\BCC55\BIN;" (exactly 1 semi-colon between references)
9.  Click on the "Set" button.
10.  Click OK (in the "System Properties" window)

* Or, if Windows 2000/XP:
Add a path reference to the Environment variables:
3.  Using the mouse, right-click on the "My Computer" icon (on your desktop) and choose "Properties".
4.  Click on the "Advanced" tab.
5.  Click on the "Environment Variables..." button.
6.  Highlight the "Path" System variable (bottom).
7.  Click on the "Edit..." button.
8.  Append the line with ";C:\BORLAND\BCC55\BIN;"
9.  Click OK (in the "Edit System Variables")
10. Click OK (in the "Environment Variables" window) and click OK (in the "System Properties" window)


Now, in the console window, type the following:
cd \ [Enter]
cd borland [Enter]
cd bcc55 [Enter]
cd bin [Enter]

______________________________

Creating the configuration files:

Note: The command line should read:  C:\BORLAND\BCC55\BIN

Part 1: Creating BCC32.CFG.
1.  Type "edit bcc32.cfg" [Enter]  (This creates the file and opens a blank window in the editor). Alternatively, you can also type, 'notepad bcc32.cfg' to edit in Windows Notepad.
2. Add these lines:

-I"c:\Borland\Bcc55\include"
-L"c:\Borland\Bcc55\lib"

3. Save the changes (Alt-F then hit S if using edit).
4. Exit edit. (Alt+F then press X if using edit).

Part 2: Creating ILINK32.CFG
5. Type "edit ilink32.cfg"  (This creates the file and opens a blank window in the editor). Alternatively, you can also type, 'notepad ilink32.cfg' to edit in Windows Notepad.
6. Add these lines:

-L"c:\Borland\Bcc55\lib"

7. Save the changes (Alt-F then hit S, if using edit).
8. Exit edit. (Alt+F then press X, if using edit).
9. Type "exit" [Enter]
10. Restart Windows.

______________________________

Testing the compiler:

Open a console box.
 1.  Start | Run...
 2.  Type "command" into the field [Enter]

 Create a directory or navigate to where you want to store your source, for example:
 3.  Type "cd"
 4.  Type "mkdir MySource"
 5.  cd Mysource
 (Now in c:\MySource)
 
 Create a new source file, for example:
 6.  Type "edit hello.cpp" Alternatively, you can also type, 'notepad hello.cpp' to edit in Windows Notepad.
 7. Paste or type the following code in the editor:

  #include <iostream.h>
  int main(void)
  {
   cout << "Hello." << endl;
   return 0;
  }

 8. Save the changes (Alt-F then hit S, if using edit).
 9. Exit edit. (Alt+F then press X, if using edit).

 Now, compile the program to create an executable:
 10. Type "bcc32 hello.cpp"

 Finally, you may run the application you created.
 11. Type "hello"
 (The output will appear below your last command line.)


If you require additional resources, please refer to our newsgroups;  they are found at the following location:

For issues regarding the command-line tools:

http://forums.embarcadero.com


Server Response from: ETNASC02