A Sip From The Firehose: April 30, 1996

By: David Intersimone

Abstract: As I'm writing this first column for "A Sip from the Firehose," I am sitting in our PR offices in London.

Sip from the Firehose

Tuesday, April 30, 1996
London, England

As I'm writing this first column for "A Sip from the Firehose," I am sitting in our PR offices in London. In future installments I hope to track with you what is happening in the world of development -- the issues, the technologies, the solutions, the challenges, the tears, the fears, the applause, the fun, and the dark side.

One striking tidbit over in Europe (besides what is happening to the royal family) is how few developers are only developing for Win32...

I'm right in the middle of a Borland technology road trip that covers nine countries in twelve days. I'm showing JavaTM/LatteTM, Borland® C++ 5.0, and DelphiTM products and technologies to press, developers, and partners. So far I have visited Moscow, Budapest, Prague, Frankfurt, and London. After leaving here I continue on to Copenhagen, Paris, Munich, and Amsterdam. Do I have a tough job or what?

It is interesting to talk with developers here in Europe and find that they are just like developers the world over. They have the same challenges and same opportunities, and, with the World Wide Web, they have access to the same information and solutions.

For the past two days I have attended the first annual Borland Developers Conference in London. More than 500 developers from the UK and Europe are here taking technical sessions on Delphi, Paradox®, Borland C++, and Interbase®. Of course we all know that in England they drive on the "correct" side of the road. With programming and design, developers also pay particular attention to the correct ways of programming. In fact, on my trip I have met many excellent developers.

Programming has never been more fun in my 27 years as a programmer

One striking tidbit over in Europe (besides what is happening to the royal family or the continuing struggle with recession and rebuilding) is how few developers are only developing for Win32, and how 99 percent of them are still doing mostly Win16 development while looking to a 32-bit future. This tells me that we need to continue to support developers who make their money building 16-bit applications.

I am traveling with two notebook computers connected by 10-based-2 Ethernet cable that forms my own little intranet (Windows 95 runs on the client and Windows NT 3.51 with service pack 3 on the server). Using the Internet Control Pack (available from Microsoft's Web site) and WinInet API on the client, and using ISAPI and the Microsoft Internet Server on the NT notebook, I have been showing developers how to build client/server intranet applications quickly and easily.

If I can get some sort of wireless global connection, then I could be live on the Web...

The convergence of these two HOT technologies and the tools for developers are still in their infancy, but to carry around such a system on the road in eastern Europe is truly marvelous. Programming has never been more fun in my 27 years as a programmer.

If I can get some sort of wireless global connection, then I could be live on the Web with the latest cool tools and apps. You could watch as I hook the Borland® Database Engine 32-bit drivers on the server into a client intranet application and let everyone try it out and give me instant feedback. I leave you with this parting word from jolly old England, on my way to wonderful, wonderful Copenhagen -- "patterns." More about this in future columns.

The firehose is large enough for everyone -- let me know what you think.

David Intersimone (davidi@inprise.com)

David Intersimone

Server Response from: ETNASC04